Since I saw him present on some preliminary results at a conference 6 years ago, I’ve been following with interest University of Albany – SUNY professor John Forsyth’s, PhD, research on his self-help book, The Mindfulness and Acceptance Workbook for Anxiety. (The Workbook was recently published in a 2nd edition but the research is on the 1st edition.) The Workbook is based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) principles, and it is designed to treat a wide range of anxiety-related problems (it’s “transdiagnostic”). Self-help books have great potential to help people who don’t have access to or don’t want to pursue psychotherapy. Unfortunately, self-help books are rarely based on well-researched treatments, let alone studied themselves as standalone treatment. Dr. Forsyth Read more

One of the problems I specialize in working with is repetitive skin picking (also known as excoriation or dermatillomania). People struggling with this problem experience intense urges to pick at blemishes or perceived imperfections in their skin. They may spend a few minutes to several hours (e.g., 8 hours or more) picking at many places on their body. The result is usually scabs, bleeding, and scarring—and everyone I’ve worked with experiences intense shame, guilt, and embarrassment immediately after they stop actively picking.   Many struggle to hide their picking for years without realizing that there’s a name for their condition—that other people struggle with similar problems. Even fewer are aware there is treatment. Unfortunately, few therapists are trained in what Read more

There’s no shortage of self-help books on the market. There is, however, a paucity of research on whether those self-help books are actually helpful to the people who use them. In an ideal world, every self-help book would be submitted to scientific scrutiny to determine if people actually benefit from using them. Unfortunately, this happens only rarely. Even a self-help book that is based on well-researched cognitive behavioral principles and written by leaders in the field is not guaranteed to be effective.  For example, one recent study found that college students with greater rumination exhibited more depressive symptoms after using Greenberger & Padesky’s Mind over Mood, a well-respected cognitive behavioral self-help book for depression. These findings suggest that evidence-based psychotherapy Read more

Hello friends and colleagues. Below is our annual report. The annual reports is part of our mission to be a responsible and transparent business that is an asset to our local and international community. We strive to be responsible stewards of the revenue provided by those clients and customers who purchase our services. We strive to use those limited resources efficiently and effectively to serve the greater good. Transparency comes through out providing updates about what we are doing with that revenue. This report summaries the most important event that occurred over the last year at Portland Psychotherapy. OUR COMMITMENT Portland Psychotherapy strives to make quality, evidence-based mental health services available to all members of our community. Supporting diversity and inclusivity is Read more

The Research Lab at Portland Psychotherapy is proud to announce they have developed and implemented the first cycle of an internal research grant program to support advances in contextual behavioral science and evidence-based psychotherapy. The first grant was dispersed in 2015 and named the Aaron S. Luoma Portland Psychotherapy Behavioral Science Research Grant/Award, in honor of Dr. Jason Luoma’s brother. Awardees included Drs. Paul Guinther, Brian Thompson, and Scott Rower. The grant has supported their ongoing work on RFT and perspective taking, ACT and OCD, and CBT-I and insomnia, respectively. A new grant cycle is underway in 2016 to continue supporting these researchers and Portland Psychotherapy’s mission of contributing to the wider community through scientific research, compassionate treatment, and effective Read more